Alinea Cookbook



Alinea

by 10 Speed Press
List price: $60.00 Price: $33.60 Buy Now

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  • Used Book in Good Condition

Product description

The debut cookbook from the restaurant Gourmet magazine named the best in the country.

A pioneer in American cuisine, chef Grant Achatz represents the best of the molecular gastronomy movement--brilliant fundamentals and exquisite taste paired with a groundbreaking approach to new techniques and equipment. ALINEA showcases Achatz's cuisine with more than 100 dishes (totaling 600 recipes) and 600 photographs presented in a deluxe volume. Three feature pieces frame the book: Michael Ruhlman considers Alinea's role in the global dining scene, Jeffrey Steingarten offers his distinctive take on dining at the restaurant, and Mark McClusky explores the role of technology in the Alinea kitchen. Buyers of the book will receive access to a website featuring video demonstrations, interviews, and an online forum that allows readers to interact with Achatz and his team.

"Achatz is something new on the national culinary landscape: a chef as ambitious as Thomas Keller who wants to make his mark not with perfection but with constant innovation . . . Get close enough to sit down and allow yourself to be teased, challenged, and coddled by Achatz's version of this kind of cooking, and you can have one of the most enjoyable culinary adventures of your life." --Corby Kummer, senior editor of Atlantic Monthly

"Someone new has entered the arena. His name is Grant Achatz, and he is redefining the American restaurant once again for an entirely new generation . . . Alinea is in perpetual motion; having eaten here once, you can't wait to come back, to see what Achatz will come up with next." --GourmetReviews & AwardsJames Beard Foundation Cookbook Award Finalist: Cooking from a professional Point of View Category  James Beard Foundation Outstanding Chef Award! "Even if your kitchen isn't equipped with a paint-stripping heat gun, thermocirculator, or refractometer, and you're only vaguely aware that chefs use siphons and foams in contemporary cooking, you can enjoy this daring cookbook from Grant Achatz of the Chicago restaurant Alinea.. . . While the recipes can hardly become part of your everday cooking, this book is far too interesting to be left on the coffee table. As you read, a question emerges: Is Alinea's food art? . . . I go a little further, describing Achatz with a word that he would probably never use to describe himself: avant-garde, as it defined art movements at the beginning of the last century--planned, self-concious, and structured attempts to provoke and shake the status quo. Just as with those artists, the results are not necessarily as interesting as the intentions and concepts behind them. In this sense, this volume constitutes a full-blown although not threatening manifesto."—Art of Eating

Amazon Best Books of the Month, October 2008: The dishes at Grant Achatz's award-winning Chicago restaurant Alinea are entirely new, yet what diners taste often resurrects their most cherished food memories. Achatz has said that flavor is memory, and of all the ways in which Alinea appeals to the senses, it's flavor that he has harnessed and reinvented in a kitchen that never rests on its laurels. (Although, Achatz has employed everything from smoking oak leaves to cinnamon torches to impart flavor, so who's to say that laurel branches are out of the question?) For a menu as ambitious as Alinea's, its cookbook incarnation is as clear a window into a chef's creative process as you could hope for, buttressed by stunning photography and thoughtful essays from Achatz and food literati Michael Ruhlman and Jeffrey Steingarten, among others. This doesn't mean necessarily that you'll cook from Alinea often, or perhaps ever: the 600 recipes are composed precisely to show that any motivated cook can recreate Alinea's dishes at home, but to do so may be missing the point. What makes Alinea remarkable--and unlike any other cookbook on the shelf--is its passionate insistence that there isn't just one recipe for being a cook. --Anne Bartholomew



A Conversation with Grant Achatz

Amazon.com: Can you describe what sets Alinea apart from other restaurant cookbooks?

Grant Achatz: We took the approach that we will present exactly what we do in the restaurant without concessions.That means that while we scaled the recipes to 8 servings, we did not convert to teaspoons or cups.This assures us that the recipes are tight and sound because we have made each of them a thousand or more times. Equally important is the fact that every single finished dish is pictured in the book.I always find it frustrating to read a great recipe and then not see the finished product.I understand that usually cost factors into showing only a portion of the recipes in picture form, but we decided that we had to take pictures of everything and we did.

I also think because the creative team involved in making the book is the same that has made Alinea what it is,the "feel" of the book exemplifies that of the restaurant.This is truly important when taking on a project of this scope, the hope is that the reader felt an Alinea experience without dining here. We wanted the book to capture the essence, the spirit of the restaurant, and I think we accomplished that. Many cookbooks set out to simply highlight recipes, we wanted more.

Amazon.com: When you started developing the book, did you have other cookbook models in mind? How did you want yours to be different?

Achatz: We wanted the book to mirror the restaurant and its philosophy in a consistent manner.We looked at various other books to set different bars--one for the aesthetic, one for the quality of the printing, others for their clarity in recipes--then we decided what we didn't like in other books and went about finding solutions.For example, giant ingredient lists at the top of a page are often frustrating when you begin to go through the recipe.So we eliminated the overall ingredient lists and placed the ingredients right next to the instructions on how to make that sub-recipe.We think that makes a ton of sense and simplifies making the recipes a great deal.We were encouraged by pretty much everyone to explain each and every dish in a header--something most books do--and realized that they all start sounding the same.At one point we started reading headers from ten different books and they were interchangeable.So we got rid of those and put the over-arching explanations and technique descriptions in the front.

Amazon.com: You designed a website to complement the cookbook. How do you hope cooks and chefs will use the site?

Achatz: Ideally a community forms where home cooks, professional chefs, and our staff can interact with each other as a community interested in pushing the culinary arts forward.By community, we mean an open exchange of ideas and encouragement.Now that we are done with the book and it is hitting stores and homes we are going to turn our attention back to the front of the Mosaic as well and start adding more content--videos, recipes, essays....

Amazon.com: Speaking of websites, how do you think "Alinea at Home" blogger Carol Blymire will fare? (She did make it through The French Laundry Cookbook…)

Achatz: We already have a section on the Mosaic where early buyers who gained access to preview recipes made dishes and posted their results--and they look fantastic!I think she will do quite well but will be forced to scale back in a few areas unless she makes this her full time job. And that is fine--we encourage ambitious amateurs to tackle the recipes by picking out key elements and making the dish their own.

Amazon.com: Since Alinea opened its doors three years ago, both you and your restaurant have earned the prestigious James Beard Award. Could you have envisioned this enormous success when you first started out?

Achatz: Our goal was to build the best restaurant in the country...that was our stated goal.Did I think we would get there?Is there such a thing?We push to refine and get better.We are certainly not the best restaurant to go to if you want a pizza. But within the high-end haute culinary world I think we compare well.I don't believe there is such a thing as "the best."But we strive for that ideal.

Amazon.com: Molecular gastronomy is something of a vogue classification these days--do you think the food at Alinea fits this description, or is the high-tech aspect of your kitchen just one piece of the puzzle?

Achatz: It is a small piece of the puzzle.Questioning convention is the bigger piece.We do that with almost every dish…and with the book.Technology is used where necessary to achieve a specific goal for a specific dish.As we say in the front of the book, we create first and worry about technology second.At the end of the day, I am a cook.

Amazon.com: Does a "molecular" approach to cooking necessarily mean that you're working with greater precision and efficiency than you would if you were only using traditional methods?

Achatz: I believe that Herve This did not mean "molecular" in the sense of chemistry when he coined the term...regardless, our approach is to do everything with a sense of purpose.Does that mean we are a precise and efficient kitchen? Absolutely.But I don't know if using unique ingredients and techniques pushes us in that direction.I think, rather, it is a commitment to overall excellence that does that.

Amazon.com: In today's ever-competitive culinary landscape, is it possible to be both low-tech and genuinely innovative? 

Achatz: Absolutely.High-tech for its own sake is a bad idea and results in a soulless cuisine. I have had some high-tech meals that fall flat and taste lousy. You can certainly be innovative with just ingredients, a knife, and a pan over heat.But why not do both if you have the inclination, desire, and ability?

Amazon.com: What advice do you have for home cooks who want to experiment with your style of cooking? Is there a technique or ingredient that's versatile enough to be a useful entry point for the uninitiated?

Achatz: You know, none of it is really that difficult to execute.It is just very time consuming as there are usually a great many mise en place requirements.So I would advise that they start with the dishes that are small in scope and build up from there.

Amazon.com: What do you enjoy most about the process of building a new recipe?

Achatz: Discovering a combination that is both unexpected and delicious.It is remarkable to me when we hit upon something that seems incredibly novel at first only to think at the end at how obvious it was--like it was sitting there just waiting to happen.

Amazon.com: What are the challenges (and, conversely, the triumphs) for your staff in serving the Alinea menu?

Achatz: We work hard with our service team to remain approachable and to have fun with the guests.The meal should be enjoyable, but there is a great deal of information that needs to get passed to the guest to maximize their enjoyment.So we work to do that in a way that doesn't sound like a lecture or a rote script.So the staff needs to find a balance between giving descriptions and keeping the evening rolling along.Most of the time they are good at reading a table to find out what kind of experience a group wants and then tailoring their service to that table. We can do formal Michelin 3-star European service, and we can do a really smooth but toned-down relaxed style.Ultimately, we have a group of people in the front of house that love the restaurant and believe passionately in what we do--and as long as that shows through above all else,the guests will be well served.

Amazon.com: What's the most gratifying presentation you've created for a dish? Is it featured in the book?

Achatz: Again, this is like asking a parent to single out their favorite  child. Impossible. I enjoy the Hot Potato–Cold Potato. I think it shows the collaboration between Martin (Kastner) and I. It exemplifies the whimsy, the function, interaction, and engagement we utilize in our dishes.

Amazon.com: Do you take in the occasional Chicago hot dog, or are your local food pleasures more quirky?

Achatz: Pot Belly's Sandwich Works is always a good call.I like pizzas, hot dogs, quintessential Chicago diners. I am not a food snob.

Amazon.com: In the book you talk about how food is as much an emotional experience as a physical one. Do you have a favorite food memory?

Achatz: I have many great food memories. The first meal at the French Laundry always lands near the top. I credit that experience with opening my eyes to the creativity of food, and establishing my relationship with my mentor Thomas Keller. 

Amazon.com: Jeffrey Steingarten was frank about his initial hesitation to eat at Alinea, wondering if he would "get" your food. What's your advice to diners who may not understand what you’re trying to do at Alinea, or who may find it intimidating?

Achatz: Try it.Really, there is no other way.I often read comments on the web or in the press about our dining experience or food from people whom I know have not eaten at the restaurant.How can they know without trying?95% of our guests come down to the kitchen at the end of the night and the look on their face tells me that they had a great experience.So I would tell anyone--young, old, from any part of the world--come try Alinea...there is a 95% chance you will "get" it.


Photography by Lara Kastner, Courtesy of Alinea & Achatz LLC.




The French Laundry Cookbook (The Thomas Keller Library)

by Artisan
List price: $50.00 Price: $27.22 Buy Now

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  • Artisan Publishers

Product description

2014 marks the twentieth anniversary of the acclaimed French Laundry restaurant in the Napa Valley—“the most exciting place to eat in the United States” (The New York Times). The most transformative cookbook of the century celebrates this milestone by showcasing the genius of chef/proprietor Thomas Keller himself. Keller is a wizard, a purist, a man obsessed with getting it right. And this, his first cookbook, is every bit as satisfying as a French Laundry meal itself: a series of small, impeccable, highly refined, intensely focused courses.

Most dazzling is how simple Keller's methods are: squeegeeing the moisture from the skin on fish so it sautées beautifully; poaching eggs in a deep pot of water for perfect shape; the initial steeping in the shell that makes cooking raw lobster out of the shell a cinch; using vinegar as a flavor enhancer; the repeated washing of bones for stock for the cleanest, clearest tastes.

From innovative soup techniques, to the proper way to cook green vegetables, to secrets of great fish cookery, to the creation of breathtaking desserts; from beurre monté to foie gras au torchon, to a wild and thoroughly unexpected take on coffee and doughnuts, The French Laundry Cookbook captures, through recipes, essays, profiles, and extraordinary photography, one of America's great restaurants, its great chef, and the food that makes both unique.

One hundred and fifty superlative recipes are exact recipes from the French Laundry kitchen—no shortcuts have been taken, no critical steps ignored, all have been thoroughly tested in home kitchens. If you can't get to the French Laundry, you can now re-create at home the very experience Wine Spectator described as “as close to dining perfection as it gets.”




 

To eat at Thomas Keller's Napa Valley restaurant, The French Laundry, is to experience a peak culinary experience. In The French Laundry Cookbook, Keller articulates his passions and offers home cooks a means to duplicate the level of perfection that makes him one of the best chefs in the U.S. and, arguably, the world.

This cookbook provides 150 recipes exactly as they are used at Keller's restaurant. It is also his culinary manifesto, in which he shares the unique creative processes that led him to invent Peas and Carrots--a succulent pillow of a lobster paired with pea shoots and creamy ginger-carrot sauce--and other high-wire culinary acts. It offers unimagined experiences, from extracting chlorophyll to use in coloring sauces to a recipe for chocolate cake accompanied by red beet ice cream and a walnut sauce. You are urged to follow Keller's recipes precisely and also to view them as blueprints. To keep them alive, they must be infused with your own commitment to perfection and pleasure, as you define those terms.

Keller's story, shared through the writing of Michael Ruhlman, shows how this chef was both born and made. After winning rave reviews when he was still in his 20s, it took a more experienced chef throwing a knife at him because he did not know how to truss a chicken to open his eyes to the importance of the discipline and techniques of classical French cooking. To acquire these fundamental skills, he apprenticed at eight of the finest restaurants in France.

Grounded in classic technique, Keller's cooking is characterized by traditional marriages of ingredients, assembled in breathtakingly daring new ways, such as Pearls and Oyster, glistening caviar and oysters served on a bed of creamy pearl tapioca. Continually piquing the palate, his meals are a procession of 5 to 10 dishes, all small portions vibrantly composed. For example, Pan Roasted Breast of Squab with Swiss Chard, Seared Foie Gras, and Oven-Dried Black Figs require just three birds to serve six. The result: you are never sated, always stimulated.

The 200 photographs by Deborah Jones include more than just beauty shots: they show how to prepare various dishes; how Keller, shown stroking a whole salmon, respects his ingredients; and how the perfection of baby fava beans still nestled in the downy lining of their succulent pod, or the seduction of an abundance of fresh caviar, calls out the best from the chef. --Dana Jacobi









Allen & Alinea: One Man’s Odyssey On account of an Iconic Cookbook

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLPUGIftRq4&feature=youtube_gdata

When Allen Hemberger dined at Award Achatz's pioneering Alinea restaurant in Chicago in 2008, he had no idea it would set him off on a 5 year odyssey to the .

Sites on a related topic



Alinea at Available: Surf Clam, Nasturitium, Shallot Marmalade

So, I'm back into the Alinea cookbook, and given that we're getting into unexpectedly and the cookbook starts with spring recipes I started with the very first dish in the book. This little amuse bouche is about four bites of food all-out and includes a clam, nasturtium and a shallot marmalade. The final garnish of this dish was the nasturitum soup. Nasturtium is a peppery type green, that I can't every discern in a store here so to the internets I turned and I had four ounces of the stuff in two days. So the first step of this component was to cook the potatoes in a bit of the half and half, store up and water. Once that was cooked that mixture went into a blender until smooth and then at that time the nasturtium leaves were added. Once the nasturtium was blended in a few ice cubes were added to silken everything out. Finally, everything went into an ice bath to chill out. The main component of this dish, clams, and their seasoning. So I don't work with clams a lot. Ironically enough, this is one of those few ingredients that restaurants for the most part make better than I do. Thankfully, one of the clams I got had a cracked shell because I don't think I could have opened any of them if not. The recipe called for surf clam, which I've never actually heard of and didn't like it think that there would be that much difference in the littleneck or middlenecks that I can get here in Bloomington. Well I got the first one opened and it was about the size of my pinky fingernail. The lemon pudding had a bit of air in the chamber and blew out on me. The bunkum on the fork was eaten in one bite and then the nasturtium soup was consumed. The fork was outstanding and I don't particularly like clam. The soup was interesting since nasturtium isn't something I normally eat. One plaice I am going to ad to these posts is a wine pairing. I generally love the wines served at these meals and I'm going to do what I can to pair appropriate wines with each of the dishes. For this one I chose an Italian wine, Inama Vin Soave Classico 2013. This should be catchy easy to track down, my local Binny's had it for $14. . Til next time where I open the French Laundry Cookbook and an amuse bouche from that justifiably...

Source: David's Food Adventures
1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die
1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die

Books


The ultimate gift for the food lover. In the same way that 1,000 Places to See Before You Die reinvented the travel book,1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die is a joyous, informative, dazzling, mouthwatering life list of the world?s best food. The long-awaited new book in the phenomenal 1,000. Before You Die series, it?s the marriage of an irresistible subject with the perfect writer, Mimi Sheraton?award-winning cookbook author, grande dame of food journalism, and former restaurant critic forThe New York Times. 1,000 Foods fully delivers on the promise of its title, selecting from the best cuisines around the world (French, Italian, Chinese, of course, but also Senegalese, Lebanese, Mongolian, Peruvian, and many more)?the tastes, ingredients, dishes, and restaurants that every reader should experience and dream about, whether it?s dinner at Chicago?s Alinea or the perfect empanada. In more than 1,000 pages and over 550 full-color photographs, it celebrates haute and snack, comforting and exotic, hyper-local and the universally enjoyed: a Tuscan plate of Fritto Misto. Saffron Buns for breakfast in downtown Stockholm. Bird?s Nest Soup. A frozen Milky Way. Black truffles from Le P?rigord. Mimi Sheraton is highly opinionated, and has a gift for supporting her recommendations with smart, sensuous descriptions?you can almost taste what she?s tasted. You?ll want to eat your way through the book (after searching first for what you have already tried, and comparing notes). Then, following the romance, the practical: where to taste the dish or find the ingredient, and where to go for the best recipes, websites included.

$12.04

1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die
1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die

Books


The ultimate gift for the food lover. In the same way that 1,000 Places to See Before You Die reinvented the travel book,1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die is a joyous, informative, dazzling, mouthwatering life list of the world?s best food. The long-awaited new book in the phenomenal 1,000. Before You Die series, it?s the marriage of an irresistible subject with the perfect writer, Mimi Sheraton?award-winning cookbook author, grande dame of food journalism, and former restaurant critic forThe New York Times. 1,000 Foods fully delivers on the promise of its title, selecting from the best cuisines around the world (French, Italian, Chinese, of course, but also Senegalese, Lebanese, Mongolian, Peruvian, and many more)?the tastes, ingredients, dishes, and restaurants that every reader should experience and dream about, whether it?s dinner at Chicago?s Alinea or the perfect empanada. In more than 1,000 pages and over 550 full-color photographs, it celebrates haute and snack, comforting and exotic, hyper-local and the universally enjoyed: a Tuscan plate of Fritto Misto. Saffron Buns for breakfast in downtown Stockholm. Bird?s Nest Soup. A frozen Milky Way. Black truffles from Le P?rigord. Mimi Sheraton is highly opinionated, and has a gift for supporting her recommendations with smart, sensuous descriptions?you can almost taste what she?s tasted. You?ll want to eat your way through the book (after searching first for what you have already tried, and comparing notes). Then, following the romance, the practical: where to taste the dish or find the ingredient, and where to go for the best recipes, websites included.

$8.32

Bing news feed

Turning tables: How technology is shaking up restaurant reservations, and profits - 03/11/15, via Globe and Mail

Of procedure, Alinea has lines of customers angling to book tables months in advance – they once had so many phone calls, it took down the entire 312-867 get someone on the blower exchange in Chicago. Some doubt that ticketing will work for everyone. “My only worry ...

Why It Took Me a Decade to The time of one's life Tweezer Food - 03/09/15, via Minneapolis City Pages (blog)

There was stacks of food I could recognize, so why bother? Someone gifted me with the Alinea cookbook, and while I was impressed with the generosity, the food looked mostly ridiculous to me. It sat on the shelf. I did not envy my friends who scored ...

Today---Mimi Sheraton and Matt Storch at the Westport Library - 02/28/15, via news.hamlethub.com

The earmark features selections from the best cuisines around the ... Among Sheraton's recommendations are dinner at Chicago’s Alinea, the perfect empanada, a Tuscan slab of fritto misto, saffron buns for breakfast in downtown Stockholm, bird’s nest ...

Directory

  1. Alinea At Residence I'm cooking my way owing to the Alinea Cookbook. In Omnia Paratus!
  2. Allen & Alinea: One Man’s Odyssey Thoroughly an Iconic Cookbook When Allen Hemberger dined at Allow Achatz’s pioneering Alinea restaurant in Chicago in 2008, he had no idea it would set him off on a 5 year odyssey to ...
  3. Alineaphile - Recreating the nutriment of Alinea Restaurant Kuroge Wagyu, Cucumber, Honeydew, Lime Sugar – Alinea cookbook way, pages 78-79. I must admit that this was the first Wagyu steak I had ever prepared.
Alinea Cookbook: photos
Alinea Cookbook: photos
Alinea, by Award Achatz
Photo by Andrew Huff on Flickr
Alinea Cookbook: photo bellman
Alinea Cookbook: photo bellman
Those are the insides of the Ban Truffle Explosion. Alinea, by Grant Achatz
Photo by Andrew Huff on Flickr
Alinea Cookbook: PB&J
Alinea Cookbook: PB&J
www.consumatron.com/2008/11/weekend-independent-too-poor-to... Inspired by both the blog Alinea At Home (http://alineaathome.typepad.com/) and by Grant Achatz' comment from the November 2008 issue of Chicago periodical where he said: "...the recipes are not hard. I challenge anyone to find a recipe in that book that is more complicated than your basic scratch chocolate cake,” I have bewitched it upon myself to cook as much from the Alinea cookbook as I can. I don't mean to be a braggart, Mr. Achatz, but I make a mean chocolate cake. For my first experiment, I've made Alinea's take on the American lunchbox first-rate, PB&J. It ain't perfect, but I'm damn proud of how these eight little bread and PB wrapped grapes turned out.
Photo by KevinElliottChi on Flickr
present achatz alinea # cookbook so in love with this book
present achatz alinea # cookbook so in love with this book
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alinea cookbook
alinea cookbook
Image by pinterest.com
Alinea Cookbook: PB&J
Alinea Cookbook: PB&J
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